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I just heard that they are euthanizing wild horses (National Geographic,February 2009) and I thought what good farm animals they would be. Not just for hauling wood out of the forest whole, as should be done, maybe not by wild horses, they are great digesters, if people can find a way to allow them to work grasses into manure. Perhaps eventually we could cooperate enough to find more land that they could graze on, and fence half of it and grow the other half, alternatively. Hum, the best of both worlds. Permaculture has a lot to say about farming with animals. Manure is a valuable thing for crops. As for wild horses, send them to Canada alive! There is plenty of land. Sure horses take up a lot of energy if you keep them in a pen and have to feed them and run them. And they must be unhappy. Permaculture asks for more than one use or yield from all of us.

video

Aprovecho

Wild Horse and Prisoner Redemption

Permaculture asks for more than one use or yield from all of us.

Permauclture and Horses

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Watershed Watch , because sometimes, nature knows best. I recommend the full version found here. . .nice animation, and delivery.
renewing_sn_foodtraditions_cover

Salmon Nation

Among all the “food nations” of North
America, Salmon Nation is the richest in
mushrooms, berries, wild roots, fish, and
shellfish. Native American traditions are at its
core, but other culinary accents – from Spanish
to Japanese – have added to the mix. Renewing
Salmon Nation’s Food Traditions describes over
180 species of local plants and animals – many
now at risk, others recovering, and all deserving
of recognition – that have formed the basis of
food traditions in the Pacific Northwest.
This illustrated handbook brings together
farmers, chefs, fisherfolk, food historians, orchardists,
activists, educators, and wild foragers in an
unprecedented effort to assess the current state of
foods unique to the Pacific Northwest. The result is
a comprehensive guide to the foods that have nurtured
Salmon Nation for centuries.
Renewing Salmon Nation’s Food Traditions
describes the appearance and taste of each species,
its origin and history, geographic range, and
culinary uses. Foods range from the Bing cherry,
Hood strawberry, and Nez Perce bean to Chinook
salmon, candlefish smelt, and geoduck to wild
items such as Oregon black truffle, wapato, and
blackcap raspberry. A resource list provides names
of nurseries, seed companies, and suppliers working
to safeguard and revitalize the heritage foods of
Salmon Nation.

1% for the Planet

On you tube.

The Big Wild

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