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Our grandparents seeded this. Our parents.
They imagine a world with people and habitat and studied it:
Habitat 76, Biomimicry, a pattern language,
Earnest Callenbach, peter oberlander, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander,
john Todd, bucky fuller, pliny fisk, Bill Mollison…
Paolo Soleri.
Ian McCaig.
Ross Evans & Kipchoge- Xtracycle
Ampersand, these are the new people with ideas that are working. Not necessarily their own ideas, but ideas that work:
solar-shower, outside bath, composting toilets, natural building, rainwater collection, brown-glass bottlewall.

Edible Parks and Ecosystems are now coming into play. The Commons is back. We have new challenges to study along with the old ones… how do we integrate food into our city and rural lives? How can we create ecological sanitation? How do we get ourselves to slow down and plan for the future? to stop buying and consuming and creating garbage and toxic dumps just because we want to consume?

I love the slow food movement. As Volkswagon says: All I know is slow.

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from: O Ecotextiles

The Surfrider Foundation has a list of ten easy things you can do to keep plastics out of our environment:

Choose to reuse when it comes to shopping bags and bottled water. Cloth bags and metal or glass reusable bottles are available locally at great prices.

Refuse single-serving packaging, excess packaging, straws and other ‘disposable’ plastics. Carry reusable utensils in your purse, backpack or car to use at bbq’s, potlucks or take-out restaurants.

Reduce everyday plastics such as sandwich bags and juice cartons by replacing them with a reusable lunch bag/box that includes a thermos.

Bring your to-go mug with you to the coffee shop, smoothie shop or restaurants that let you use them. A great way to reduce lids, plastic cups and/or plastic-lined cups.

Go digital! No need for plastic cds, dvds and jewel cases when you can buy your music and videos online.

Seek out alternatives to the plastic items that you rely on.

Recycle. If you must use plastic, try to choose #1 (PETE) or #2 (HDPE), which are the most commonly recycled plastics. Avoid plastic bags and polystyrene foam as both typically have very low recycling rates.

Volunteer at a beach cleanup. Surfrider Foundation Chapters often hold cleanups monthly or more frequently.

Support plastic bag bans, polystyrene foam bans and bottle recycling bills.

Spread the word. Talk to your family and friends about why it is important to Rise Above Plastics!

Surfrider

O Ecotextiles

I just heard that they are euthanizing wild horses (National Geographic,February 2009) and I thought what good farm animals they would be. Not just for hauling wood out of the forest whole, as should be done, maybe not by wild horses, they are great digesters, if people can find a way to allow them to work grasses into manure. Perhaps eventually we could cooperate enough to find more land that they could graze on, and fence half of it and grow the other half, alternatively. Hum, the best of both worlds. Permaculture has a lot to say about farming with animals. Manure is a valuable thing for crops. As for wild horses, send them to Canada alive! There is plenty of land. Sure horses take up a lot of energy if you keep them in a pen and have to feed them and run them. And they must be unhappy. Permaculture asks for more than one use or yield from all of us.

video

Aprovecho

Wild Horse and Prisoner Redemption

Permaculture asks for more than one use or yield from all of us.

Permauclture and Horses

questlogo

Quest Outreach in Vancouver BC

Almost two decades ago, Quest Outreach Society launched an innovative business model: to rescue food — perfectly good cans, boxes and perishables — that would otherwise be tossed in the garbage and headed for our landfills, and redirect it to hungry people in the Lower Mainland who need it most. We call it the Quest Food Exchange.

What You Want is What You Need

The Idea of a Local Economy

Pacific Permaculture

Earth Matters

B.C. Institute of Agrologists

Vertical Farm

Urben Integrated Farming and the Buckminster Fuller Institute Challenge

From Eco-cities to Living Machines

From Eco-cities to Living Machines

In this book John Todd talks about Vertical Farms, about growing mushrooms and having rooftop gardens, about farming in warehouses in the city.

John Todd’s website is Todd Ecological. He and Nancy Todd have been working with Bucky Fuller’s ideas at a Ocean Arks International, which used to be called New Alchemy.

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