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Our grandparents seeded this. Our parents.
They imagine a world with people and habitat and studied it:
Habitat 76, Biomimicry, a pattern language,
Earnest Callenbach, peter oberlander, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander,
john Todd, bucky fuller, pliny fisk, Bill Mollison…
Paolo Soleri.
Ian McCaig.
Ross Evans & Kipchoge- Xtracycle
Ampersand, these are the new people with ideas that are working. Not necessarily their own ideas, but ideas that work:
solar-shower, outside bath, composting toilets, natural building, rainwater collection, brown-glass bottlewall.

Edible Parks and Ecosystems are now coming into play. The Commons is back. We have new challenges to study along with the old ones… how do we integrate food into our city and rural lives? How can we create ecological sanitation? How do we get ourselves to slow down and plan for the future? to stop buying and consuming and creating garbage and toxic dumps just because we want to consume?

I love the slow food movement. As Volkswagon says: All I know is slow.

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from: O Ecotextiles

The Surfrider Foundation has a list of ten easy things you can do to keep plastics out of our environment:

Choose to reuse when it comes to shopping bags and bottled water. Cloth bags and metal or glass reusable bottles are available locally at great prices.

Refuse single-serving packaging, excess packaging, straws and other ‘disposable’ plastics. Carry reusable utensils in your purse, backpack or car to use at bbq’s, potlucks or take-out restaurants.

Reduce everyday plastics such as sandwich bags and juice cartons by replacing them with a reusable lunch bag/box that includes a thermos.

Bring your to-go mug with you to the coffee shop, smoothie shop or restaurants that let you use them. A great way to reduce lids, plastic cups and/or plastic-lined cups.

Go digital! No need for plastic cds, dvds and jewel cases when you can buy your music and videos online.

Seek out alternatives to the plastic items that you rely on.

Recycle. If you must use plastic, try to choose #1 (PETE) or #2 (HDPE), which are the most commonly recycled plastics. Avoid plastic bags and polystyrene foam as both typically have very low recycling rates.

Volunteer at a beach cleanup. Surfrider Foundation Chapters often hold cleanups monthly or more frequently.

Support plastic bag bans, polystyrene foam bans and bottle recycling bills.

Spread the word. Talk to your family and friends about why it is important to Rise Above Plastics!

Surfrider

O Ecotextiles

Very important environmenal piece:
Natural Capital

nullChristy Moormann

About Greater Vancouver Watersheds

Salmon Creek Watershed

Vancouver, WA

Sustainability Management

Especially in the case of being vegetarian, manure is hard to come by, if you don’t have animals to work with. In the case of Permanent Agriculture, where we want to give back more than we are taking, building a reserve of abundance to have and to share, we can choose to be the animals and compost out own ‘waste’ preserve not only water but all of the valuable resources that were previously heading down our toilets to be dealt with in an overflowing chemical system of fear of our own bodies. Psychology might call this self rejection. At any rate my soul is ecstatic that this cycle is finally finding a way to close. Let the A-Bun-Dance begin!

Humanure in Haiti

Humanure Handbook

Akvo, the open source for water and sanitation.

Application of ecological sanitation and permaculture techniques: food
and water security for indigenous tribes and rural areas in Brazil.

Ecological Engineering

Ecological Sanitation Research

Pan African Conservation Education

Ecological Sanitation
© Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
All rights reserved
Published by
Department for Natural Resources and the Environment,
Sida, S-105 25 Stockholm, Sweden

Humanure Handbook teaches how to use nutrient rich waste as a resource. . .

Watershed Watch , because sometimes, nature knows best. I recommend the full version found here. . .nice animation, and delivery.
renewing_sn_foodtraditions_cover

Salmon Nation

Among all the “food nations” of North
America, Salmon Nation is the richest in
mushrooms, berries, wild roots, fish, and
shellfish. Native American traditions are at its
core, but other culinary accents – from Spanish
to Japanese – have added to the mix. Renewing
Salmon Nation’s Food Traditions describes over
180 species of local plants and animals – many
now at risk, others recovering, and all deserving
of recognition – that have formed the basis of
food traditions in the Pacific Northwest.
This illustrated handbook brings together
farmers, chefs, fisherfolk, food historians, orchardists,
activists, educators, and wild foragers in an
unprecedented effort to assess the current state of
foods unique to the Pacific Northwest. The result is
a comprehensive guide to the foods that have nurtured
Salmon Nation for centuries.
Renewing Salmon Nation’s Food Traditions
describes the appearance and taste of each species,
its origin and history, geographic range, and
culinary uses. Foods range from the Bing cherry,
Hood strawberry, and Nez Perce bean to Chinook
salmon, candlefish smelt, and geoduck to wild
items such as Oregon black truffle, wapato, and
blackcap raspberry. A resource list provides names
of nurseries, seed companies, and suppliers working
to safeguard and revitalize the heritage foods of
Salmon Nation.

Since green politics emerged as an ideology, it has been defined by a few key green principles. The German Greens drafted the earliest statement of this kind, called the Four Pillars of the Green Party. The Four Pillars have been repeated by many green parties worldwide as a foundational statement of the green ideology:

* Ecological wisdom
* Social justice
* Grassroots democracy
* Nonviolence

In Canada. Read the rest of this entry »

melody

. . . Bill also went on to say that the hurricanes Katrina and Rita were probably one of the most devastating events to affect not only hummingbirds, but migratory birds in general. Vegetation was completely destroyed all along the coast where the hummingbirds rested and put on fat for their 600 mile journey across the Gulf of Mexico. Many were lost over the gulf as they had no reserves to sustain them on the migration.

Hummingbirds rest and build reserves of fat all along the coast in preparation for their journey. They need proteins and fat to gain this weight. Sugar water and nectar alone will not build fat, it only gives them quick energy to hunt the insects that they need to build body mass. By the time they migrate, Ruby-throat hummingbirds will have nearly doubled their weight. These reserves are used in the twenty hour non-stop flight to their winter feeding grounds in Central America. Many people do not know that hummingbirds have a diet other than nectar. It is important to restrict the use of pesticides in habitats where you want to attract hummingbirds because, ‘a’ you are killing a potential food source when you spray, and ‘b’ the nectar in the flowers gets contaminated with the residue. The hummingbirds drink the nectar, so you are in effect poisoning the birds.

Bill suggests the best way to attract hummingbirds is a complete Hummingbird Habitat, rather than a Hummingbird Garden. There should be several different nectar sources, safe shelter, nesting areas, water, and solid food. For solid food, he suggests cultivating a healthy population of fruit flies. It seems that the birds love them. A few melon rinds, bananas, or rotten apples stashed in an out of the way area and kept moist, should do the trick.

from: Dave’s Garden

Puget Sound Georgia Basin Research Conference:

The biennial Puget Sound Georgia Basin Ecosystem Conference is the largest, most comprehensive scientific research and policy conference in the Salish Sea region. The 2009 conference, hosted by the Puget Sound Partnership and Environment Canada, will further the experiences of previous conferences by connecting scientific research and management techniques to priorities for meaningful action. The 2009 conference will emphasize the importance of working collaboratively to solve some of the complex issues that cross political borders.

Elwha:

The Elwha watershed is the largest in Olympic National Park; restoration of salmon to the over 70 miles of river and tributaries will return vital nutrients to the watershed and will restore the entire ecosystem. For the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, this project will bring cultural, spiritual and economic healing as salmon return after a century’s absence and flooded sacred sites are restored.

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